NEW JAPANESE NOISE //

Album label: 
Release date: 
10/10/2018
Recording location: 
Roskilde festival, Denmark
Recording date: 
Wednesday, July 4, 2018
Artwork design: 
Lasse Marhaug
Mastering engineer: 
Lasse Marhaug
Mixing engineer: 
Lasse Marhaug
Recording engineer: 
Christian Obermayer
  • 1. Stiff Upper Lip Jeeves (10:25)
  • 2. Up the Line to Death (08:54)
  • 3. Eats, Shites and Leaves (13:28)
  • 4. The Bone People (10:17)
  • 5. Birdsong (03:16)

Akira Sakata: alto saxophone, Bb clarinet, voice
Kiko Dinucci:electric guitar
Kohei Gomi: electronics
Paal Nilssen-Love: drums
Toshiji Mikawa: electronics

For the 2018 edition of the Roskilde festival in Denmark Paal Nilssen-Love was asked to put together two special projects. Nilssen- Love chose to put together two groups: The first was a Brazil-based band. The second was a Japan-oriented band, bringing together three giants of Japanese free jazz and noise music for the first time: Saxophone player Akira Sakata is the biggest legend of them all — since the 60s Sakata has left a permanent mark on Japanese music. With more than 200 recording credits to his name Sakata first made his mark with the Yosuke Yamashita Trio, and then over the years has gone on to numerous projects. Noise artist Kohei Gomi is best known for his Pain Jerk project, which since its foundation in the early 1990s perfectly encapsulates the classic Japanese noise sound, but also exhibiting a clearly personal style that has evolved over the years. Toshiji Mikawa has as the leader of his Incapacitants project since the early 80s shown an absolutely uncompromising dedicating the craft of pure noise music. Paralell to this he has been a member of the equally seminal Hijokaidan band. Very few artists in the field of noise music enjoys the kind of respect Mikawa does. To make a link to the other Roskilde project Nilssen-Love also added Brazilian guitarist Kiko Dinucci to the line-up, which of course shows the connection between the two bands, but also is a clear proofs of Nilssen-Love’s method of combining expressions and crossing musicial borders to kick the music forward. And with musicians from three continents it also shows that noise music is a global language. Play loud.