Knknighgh (Minimal Poetry for Aram Saroyan) //

Album label: 
Release date: 
01/07/2017
Recording location: 
Oktaven Studios, Mt. Vernon, NY
Recording date: 
Saturday, October 29, 2016
Executive producer: 
Pedro Costa
Mastering engineer: 
Ryan Streber
Mixing engineer: 
Ryan Streber
Producer: 
Nate Wooley
Recording engineer: 
Ryan Streber
  • 1. Knknighgh 3 (16:19)
  • 2. Knknighgh 4 (12:36)
  • 3. Knknighgh 6 (11:06)
  • 4. Knknighgh 7 (06:36)
  • 5. Knknighgh 8 (10:15)

Nate Wooley - trumpet
Chris Pitsiokos - alto saxophone
Brandon Lopez - bass
Dré Hočevar - drums

We can say without exaggeration that the new project by Nate Wooley introduces in the so-called “free jazz” format a system that few times – if ever – we encountered with such a relevance for the musical results since the harmolodic process proposed by Ornette Coleman. And the always surprising trumpeter is very much aware of the ground breaking possibilities of this band with the upcoming New York musicians Chris Pitsiokos, Brandon Lopez and Dré Hocevar, and of the music recorded in “Knknighgh” (to be pronounced as “knife”), when presenting it as «a radical new take on the classic free jazz quartet tradition». So it is: you imediatly recognize the approach as free jazz, and yet, free jazz never sounded like this before.

The band uses short composed materials written by Wooley and those fragmented materials are looped and pushed to the limit, triggered by any of the players in whatever order chosen in the moment. At first, the procedure seems to adapt some of the repetitive strategies of minimal music, and yet again, it doesn’t sound like minimalism, and neither it is a crossover between free jazz and minimal music. Wooley’s new system gets its references outside of music, and namely in the poetry of Aram Saroyan, «the master of the one word poem», as punk singer and writer Richard Hell calls him. Of course, both Hell and Wooley are particularly interested in the musical qualities of Saroyan’s poetry, its rhythmic fluency, its alliterations, its repetition of syllabs and inherent sounds. From it, Nate Wooley created a new kind of free jazz in which less is more and the resume of a particular melodic phrase isn’t necessarily the reintroduction of a chorus line. Prepare yourself to be marveled…